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Author Topic: Old Weedy Buys Stock From Hicks
John-
Wubbel

Posts: 142
Post Old Weedy Buys Stock From Hicks
on: December 17, 2017,
Quote

Translated: The Chicago Great Western purchased stock cars from The Hicks Stock Car Company, of Chicago, Illinois. This is my first post to the forum so I hope to spur discussions around my favorite road the CGW. About 8 months ago I embarked on a scratch building project to develop a particular type of Stock Car in the CGW fleet. I had several criteria for wanting to try such a project. First, the car is not available from a manufacturer or in a kit. Second, it has to be unique in itself among other cars in its class. I also have a certain philosophy when it comes to modeling. I try to build it out as it would look when in service and not freshly delivered from the manufacturer to the railroad. And I just don't mean a weathering job. Also, the model has to be tough/sturdy enough for operating on a robust layout with detailing that is going to hold up well because I have a habit of accidently knocking off the detail parts. I am not wanting a shelf model per se. I chose the CGW 6517 car and as it turns out my research into the Hicks revealed the company was a very competitive builder back in the 1890's. Bohn Chapin Hicks was granted patents for a number of innovations and I have all those printed out with drawings and explanations that were submitted to the patent office. Suffice it to say, even though having specifications it can increase the complexity for the modeler making it that much more challenging. A few of his patents included partitions inside the car, watering troughs and double decks. Given that photos of the Hicks cars are rare, one does not have a lot of visuals to go on so it is easy to make mistakes as not all cars had the features of these patents. I suppose it depended on what the railroad ordered. If CGW shipped cattle and sheep from Elizabeth, Illinois to the Chicago Stock Yards (approx. 150 miles) a double deck model without water troughs might of filled the need whereas Santa Fe shipping cattle in from way out west, water troughs might have made more sense to help reduce trauma or losses during shipping.

I will keep the discussion going and provide photos of my progress in hopes of getting constructive comments from this community because I am far from being a master modeler. So any suggestions are most appreciated.

John

Ed Bommer

Posts: 411
Post Re: Old Weedy Buys Stock From Hicks
on: December 18, 2017,
Quote

You have an interesting project there.
Besides researching the various patents developed for stock cars, you may also need to check on the related aspects of how cattle, hogs, etc. were handled while on their way to packing houses.

One of he first issues I think concerned animal safety while being transported: how many to a car, how much room they had within to reduce the prospects of injuries and death.

Another was adequate rest, especially for long distance transport. As things developed, beef cattle had to be given rest stops along the way, where they were unloaded from the cars and put into feed lots for a specific period of time. This rest, with available feed and water reduced the stress of travel, which led to weight loss. It also provided an opportunity cull out animals showing signs of disease or illness.

One transporting hogs by rail, they too required rest periods as well as being hosed-down, especially in hot weather to keep them cooled. There were hosing stations, where water hoses (as large as like fire truck hoses) sprayed water into the hog cars as they slowly rolled by.

While some patents on the surface may have seemed like a good idea, it would well be that in practice they did not work out all that well. Water troughs might be one of them, in that water would be consumed and also sloshed out in transit from the way the cars rode or the train they were in was being handled. Also, animals confined in the could possibly soil the water troughs with their solid and liquid wastes. Water troughs would therefore need frequent checking, cleaning and refilling along the way. And sadly, even back then, employees did not always follow through on details if weather was bad, the train running late, or other matters taking a priority. It may well be that rest stops followed after on board water troughs were not successful.

Better treatment for animals in transit was a gradual development, coming about at first because of losses from injuries, disease and sometimes death. Then too, the issue of weight loss between loading and arrival at packing plants. In those case the bottom line dictated better treatment was needed. Then, there was the development of humane societies dedicated to animal safety and health.

An interesting field of transportation research!
Ed Bommer

John-
Wubbel

Posts: 142
Post Re: Old Weedy Buys Stock From Hicks
on: December 18, 2017,
Quote

Ed,
Thank you for the additional information. A first look at railroading one does not realize just how labor
intensive it is to ship livestock or ice down a long line of refrigerator cars for meat packers in the
early days. More focus is always given to the big jobs of keeping the locomotives ready to run and not
necessarily because working steam is more glamorous although more action is associated with the results of
the labor. Researching the patents I found related articles about those period times and the press in
those days demanding more human treatment toward the livestock. The American Humane commenced in 1887
organized and worked to secure humane treatment for livestock in transit. It seemed like the patents
started to follow with Hicks by 1891 and others of course. To study the patents and learning about the
implementation and mechanics of their devices it is ease to look pass the reasons for these new mechanical
developments. While a water trough seems to alleviate concerns for the humane treatment, on the other hand
the patent for a double deck implies an ability to handle more tonnage. On the other hand, shippers that
suffered loss in transit perhaps demanded partitions within the car to keep separate bulls and steers. But a
careful read in some of the patent applications the inventor Hicks goes into more specific details for
reasons why building out partitions became a necessity. It is satisfying to think these things through but
also in the context of competition. There was Canda (CCCC), Mather, Doud and Pullman in the business of
building equipment located out of Chicago so it is fairly safe to say they all had competitive intelligence
going. The Union Stock Yards in Chicago was of course the driving force as to why firms located manufacturing
with the large railroads converging there as well. If you wanted to sell rail cars it was probably a good
idea to be in Chicago.

You mention servicing facilities which is another detail I often overlook on the layout. Typically the level of detail most noticeable on a layout are the loading and coral facilities to handle livestock. And as you said employees do not always follow through on details. Consequently, a patent does not tell us anything about actual practice or protocols for use while in transit or preparations for transit. The design of the trough does communicate that Hicks knew about the problems with keeping fresh water available so perhaps one could speculate that because of sloshing water was only dispensed during stops along the way. However, the patent illustrates that the troughs rotate for deployment when it is time to water the animals or for cleaning. This implies that water to the animals was not a constant while in transit.

Patent No. 451,682 for Double-Deck Stock Cars goes on with 4 pages discussing the problems of integrating
these improvements into the cars. The double-deck like a retracted partition folds or elevates up to the roof
for when the deck is not required but could also prevent access to the cars through a roof hatch or servicing
the watering system. Apparently, a stock car transports live stock in one direction and the railroads would
remove the deck to use the stock car for freight transport as a box car in the other direction.

Here a link on a web page to the CGW 6517 photo

http://www.midcontinent.org/rollingstock/builders/hicks_loco_freight.htm

This indeed is an interesting field of research.

John

John-
Wubbel

Posts: 142
Post Re: Old Weedy Buys Stock From Hicks
on: December 18, 2017,
Quote

So the question is where to start? Fortunately, today we have a much wider variety of materials, glues, resins and tools to work with in building models compared to what was available in the 1960's or 1970's. What this means is it has opened up a whole venue of methods available to find better ways to solve problems during the construction. Scratch building does not come with instructions and much of what we can learn comes from attending O Scale meets and clinics put on by guys that have been building for years. So while the benefit of new materials and glues seem to put us ahead of the curve for making it easier to build from scratch, it also presents often times a whole new learning curve to over come. When my grandfather build stock cars from scratch they were almost entirely out of wood. If we really want to get fancy we can fire up the CAD application and try designing 3D printed detail parts. But, do we really want to be a draftsman or a CNC hobbiest? I tend to limit myself to test my own construction skills to derive satisfaction and that allows me as the artist to facilitate my own interpretation regardless of whether the model is judged to be absolutely prototypical.

Prior to and leading up to the start of building the Hicks Stock Car, I was hard at work fixing and upgrading many of the models that my grandfather left to me many of which had wear and tear because he loved to operate big long trains on the layout. When I started experimenting with the new materials and glues and buying basket case kits to fix up I was encouraged that some of what I learned could be used in building from scratch. So for example, carbon fiber flat bars in the right application made good inconspicuous reinforcement to the deteriorating plastic Weaver FA motor platforms. The CGW Hicks car has all manner of materials that include wood, brass, hdpe, etc., in combination where I can achieve a structural goal or visual effect. Because I have had difficulty at times sourcing materials like special brass shapes and sizes, one has to turn to fabricating what you need in the shop. Luckily, I have a pretty good inventory of materials, castings and parts in shop to turn to, with the Internet as the alternative to hobby shops. It is not uncommon to put a model on hold until certain materials or parts are sourced and purchased. If I mess up trying something new when fixing or upgrading a basket case model, I lose no sleep and very little money if an idea does not pan out.

John

John-
Wubbel

Posts: 142
Post Re: Old Weedy Buys Stock From Hicks
on: December 18, 2017,
Quote

Quote from John Wubbel on December 18, 2017,
So the question is where to start? Fortunately, today we have a much wider variety of materials, glues, resins and tools to work with in building models compared to what was available in the 1960's or 1970's. What this means is it has opened up a whole venue of methods available to find better ways to solve problems during the construction. Scratch building does not come with instructions and much of what we can learn comes from attending O Scale meets and clinics put on by guys that have been building for years. So while the benefit of new materials and glues seem to put us ahead of the curve for making it easier to build from scratch, it also presents often times a whole new learning curve to over come. When my grandfather build stock cars from scratch they were almost entirely out of wood. If we really want to get fancy we can fire up the CAD application and try designing 3D printed detail parts. But, do we really want to be a draftsman or a CNC hobbiest? I tend to limit myself to test my own construction skills to derive satisfaction and that allows me as the artist to facilitate my own interpretation regardless of whether the model is judged to be absolutely prototypical.

Prior to and leading up to the start of building the Hicks Stock Car, I was hard at work fixing and upgrading many of the models that my grandfather left to me many of which had wear and tear because he loved to operate big long trains on the layout. When I started experimenting with the new materials and glues and buying basket case kits to fix up I was encouraged that some of what I learned could be used in building from scratch. So for example, carbon fiber flat bars in the right application made good inconspicuous reinforcement to the deteriorating plastic Weaver FA motor platforms. The CGW Hicks car has all manner of materials that include wood, brass, hdpe, etc., in combination where I can achieve a structural goal or visual effect. Because I have had difficulty at times sourcing materials like special brass shapes and sizes, one has to turn to fabricating what you need in the shop. Luckily, I have a pretty good inventory of materials, castings and parts in shop to turn to, with the Internet as the alternative to hobby shops. It is not uncommon to put a model on hold until certain materials or parts are sourced and purchased. If I mess up trying something new when fixing or upgrading a basket case model, I lose no sleep and very little money if an idea does not pan out.

John

Image

John-
Wubbel

Posts: 142
Post Re: Old Weedy Buys Stock From Hicks
on: December 19, 2017,
Quote

HDPE, High-density polyethylene SPI resin ID code 2. The above photo was my first stab at actually working with HDPE 2. Since we have so much of this material we recycle out of the kitchen I started to play around with this plastic for its potential use in model building. It was a huge pain in the neck. Nothing sticks to this material, not glues or paint and glues used to paste labels on these HDPE food grade containers are only disclaimed to stay on for a limited time. Given my stubbornness I had to try anyway. HDPE material is really very tough stuff when it comes down to it. While it is kind of a long learning story to tell about it from laminating, heating it to mold parts and many other things in between, I finally realized that sense glue was useless heat fusion was not. Consequently, I built up the ends of the stock car using HDPE strips and doing what I call micro welding. I use a needle nose tip on a wood burning iron and started welding the pieces together. So far I like the strength and visual effect such as the natural warpage I can get in a panel of boards. Rivets or simulated bolts are easy to do by coming in from the back side of the strip laid on a piece of glass and poke the hot needle through to bulge it out on the front side. Now I will admit at this point my final decision to keep the ends depends on how it looks when it is all painted. I will save the painting explanation for another post later.

In addition, I used HDPE to build the wood deck with the intention to laminate to the wood sub-floor super
structure. HDPE was used to model the internal roof super structure which no one will see. The HDPE drills
and taps nicely as well. I am wondering if it would make for good bearings in journals since it is also a
slippery material. It would work so long as you don't run with hot boxes.

John-
Wubbel

Posts: 142
Post Re: Old Weedy Buys Stock From Hicks
on: December 19, 2017,
Quote

Quote from John Wubbel on December 19, 2017,
HDPE, High-density polyethylene SPI resin ID code 2. The above photo was my first stab at actually working with HDPE 2. Since we have so much of this material we recycle out of the kitchen I started to play around with this plastic for its potential use in model building. It was a huge pain in the neck. Nothing sticks to this material, not glues or paint and glues used to paste labels on these HDPE food grade containers are only disclaimed to stay on for a limited time. Given my stubbornness I had to try anyway. HDPE material is really very tough stuff when it comes down to it. While it is kind of a long learning story to tell about it from laminating, heating it to mold parts and many other things in between, I finally realized that sense glue was useless heat fusion was not. Consequently, I built up the ends of the stock car using HDPE strips and doing what I call micro welding. I use a needle nose tip on a wood burning iron and started welding the pieces together. So far I like the strength and visual effect such as the natural warpage I can get in a panel of boards. Rivets or simulated bolts are easy to do by coming in from the back side of the strip laid on a piece of glass and poke the hot needle through to bulge it out on the front side. Now I will admit at this point my final decision to keep the ends depends on how it looks when it is all painted. I will save the painting explanation for another post later.

In addition, I used HDPE to build the wood deck with the intention to laminate to the wood sub-floor super
structure. HDPE was used to model the internal roof super structure which no one will see. The HDPE drills
and taps nicely as well. I am wondering if it would make for good bearings in journals since it is also a
slippery material. It would work so long as you don't run with hot boxes.

Image

John-
Wubbel

Posts: 142
Post Re: Old Weedy Buys Stock From Hicks
on: December 20, 2017,
Quote

As I said nothing sticks to HDPE. So painting on this plastic is a problem and almost relegates this
material to be useless if it is used in a cosmetic application. I tried roughing it up and giving it some
tooth and priming it but the paint still comes off. However, as I proceeded to learn I was able to achieve
some success that I think is almost as good as getting paint to stick to brass. And we all know that
eventually paint does chip, scratch or degrades over time from the elements. I even tried to bake it on
and no cigar. And, it is widely known that in the auto body repair industry they deal with HDPE
replacement parts and paint issues. Everything from milk bottles to auto parts, the blow molding or injection processes is
the way HDPE can take on so many different shapes. As far as coloring goes, colors can be calibrated with the
beads or pellets used in manufacturing parts. Unfortunately, the modeler has no control over coloring when recycling this material for other purposes so painting is the only option. One method that is misleading for example you might have a HDPE container of yogurt and the container has an unusual shape to it presumably for marketing purposes. And the container looks painted but in reality rather than paint or gluing a label on, it has a shrink wrap plastic layer that is tightly bound to the container's shape and because of the shape of the container the label is locked on and does not slip off.

To make a long post short, there is a primer put out by Krylon called Fusion that works well. In my
experimentation, I have utilized an aerosol contact spray on the HDPE which is very sticky stuff and goes
on without much texture. Once dry, I come along with a primer and felt the results were satisfactory to
not discard HDPE all together for use of HPDE in model building. Paint experimentation was on a very slick
and shiny pieces of HDPE where as the stock car ends with all the boards and differential surface areas,
I think the paint will be just fine either with a Krylon Fusion coat or a contact glue over spray followed
by a primer.

John-
Wubbel

Posts: 142
Post Re: Old Weedy Buys Stock From Hicks
on: December 21, 2017,
Quote

I am going to post a few photos now to show my current progress thus far in building the Hicks Stock Car. Then, I will step back and post a few more notes on how I arrived to this point in the project to date. I fabricated the first door for side #1 I still need to come up with hardware detail. Not sure yet were I can source that if available or maybe get creative on my own. If anyone has any suggestions please let me know. This car is far from being completed.

John-
Wubbel

Posts: 142
Post Re: Old Weedy Buys Stock From Hicks
on: December 21, 2017,
Quote

Quote from John Wubbel on December 21, 2017,
I am going to post a few photos now to show my current progress thus far in building the Hicks Stock Car. Then, I will step back and post a few more notes on how I arrived to this point in the project to date. I fabricated the first door for side #1 I still need to come up with hardware detail. Not sure yet were I can source that if available or maybe get creative on my own. If anyone has any suggestions please let me know. This car is far from being completed.

Image
Image
Image

John-
Wubbel

Posts: 142
Post Re: Old Weedy Buys Stock From Hicks
on: December 21, 2017,
Quote

Below are 3 more photos at different angles. Keep in mind things are always subject to change if I decide something is not just right such that I can do better or if I get constructive comments from viewers reading this forum. For now the car is held together with tape and rubber bands.

John-
Wubbel

Posts: 142
Post Re: Old Weedy Buys Stock From Hicks
on: December 21, 2017,
Quote

Quote from John Wubbel on December 21, 2017,
Below are 3 more photos at different angles. Keep in mind things are always subject to change if I decide something is not just right such that I can do better or if I get constructive comments from viewers reading this forum. For now the car is held together with tape and rubber bands.

Image
Image
Image

John-
Wubbel

Posts: 142
Post Re: Old Weedy Buys Stock From Hicks
on: December 21, 2017,
Quote

Another fabrication process employed in scratch building may happen to be in making parts. While I have
experimented with HDPE, I found out though that no tools for modelers exist to manipulate the material
through the preparation stage, heating and compression short of inventing some of my own gadgets. Shearing
HDPE is rather easy, laminating 2 or 3 sheets is also not problematic. However, if you need to laminate or
build a block for further machining, you really need an oven and a press. Handling the hot HDPE is also a
challenge without the right tools. Having said that, I have been able to make some interesting small
pieces such as HDPE rods.

Since my time is limited and experimentation with HDPE is a long term learning process, I fell back on
developing some parts using resin. For example, a simple part such as a bolster I was able to replicate
first in a HDPE mold. Although HDPE does not shrink as much as one would expect upon cooling so making a
mold from an orginal part can be difficult to extract it from the HDPE. A thin sheet of HDPE does not behave exactly like using a sheet of styrene under vacuum forming conditions as its elastic properties are different. HDPE is not my preferred way of creating a mold for casting. I have also used latex coats for building up a rubber mold but more recently had success using paraffin wax, extracting the original part and then pouring the resin. In realty I don't care if I destroy the wax mold after the resin sets because it is easy enough to make another one in wax. Consequently, I had a nicely machined bolster in brass that came from another kit that had the exact shape I wanted without any protruding detail and so extraction from the wax mold was easy.

So using a variety of techniques without any worry regarding whether or not it is an all brass model seems
to get me toward a more prototypical result. Just know that working HDPE requires heat and even though it
is pliable at 350 degrees it requires a lot of force to manipulate. It does not pour and thus the reason
injection into a sturdy die is perhaps mandatory. While a resin part (depending on the type) may not seem
as tough as HDPE, I still like its properties. Again, with this material you have to go through the
learning curve before you decide if you like it or not for certain applications.

John-
Wubbel

Posts: 142
Post Re: Old Weedy Buys Stock From Hicks
on: December 21, 2017,
Quote

The following are photos of wax molds as follow up to the previous post.

John-
Wubbel

Posts: 142
Post Re: Old Weedy Buys Stock From Hicks
on: December 21, 2017,
Quote

Quote from John Wubbel on December 21, 2017,
The following are photos of wax molds as follow up to the previous post. The 3rd photo shows a resin part from a previous wax mold.

Image
Image
Image

John-
Wubbel

Posts: 142
Post Re: Old Weedy Buys Stock From Hicks
on: December 22, 2017,
Quote

In order to meet my criteria about building a sturdy model for operations and handling, I would like to speak to the super-structure. In this model I started with a piece of oak for the sub-floor with the intention of laying a detailed wood decking over it for the inside and of course detailing the underside with truss rods on queen posts with brake rigging. Probably the most time I have spend fixing up plastic models is when the coupler pockets fail or comes apart from the plastic frame. For example in the case of Weaver hopper cars and due to weight that was added to balance a car, older plastic gives way. I have sometimes gone to the trouble of replacing the entire main beam and bolsters where these plastic components cracked or became brittle.

Consequently, the Hicks car has brass end plates mounted to the oak subfloor and couplers securely mounted with threaded screws so if any kind of service is needed glue will not be required. With the floor and ends roughed out and just like the manufacturer, I started framing the body up and custom cutting the brass stock and soldering it all up. The posted photo of the beginnings of the frame immediately provided the strength I was looking for after pinning for assembly. An added benefit to having a sturdy super structure is the fact that during scratch building a good amount of handling the piece takes place so there is less worry about collapsing or breaking anything delicate. Routine or periodic assembly is required to check dimensions, fit and plain old visual acuity for accuracy. Without any kind of blue print to go by, that is the best one can do except in my case I was also comparing it to other stock cars of that era to see if my own vision made sense.

With a strong body, my long term vision when starting this project was to be able to incorporate detail inside the car. While 6517 does not have watering troughs or a double-deck as near as I can tell, I am pretty sure it had the partition system. Thus in a future post I will write up something on those aspects of the build out when I get to that point. The partition mechanicals are built into the roof. Thus, the framing for the roof also had to be of a certain strength. Once again the roof frame is fabricated from brass.

John-
Wubbel

Posts: 142
Post Re: Old Weedy Buys Stock From Hicks
on: December 22, 2017,
Quote

Quote from John Wubbel on December 22, 2017,
In order to meet my criteria about building a sturdy model for operations and handling, I would like to speak to the super-structure. In this model I started with a piece of oak for the sub-floor with the intention of laying a detailed wood decking over it for the inside and of course detailing the underside with truss rods on queen posts with brake rigging. Probably the most time I have spend fixing up plastic models is when the coupler pockets fail or comes apart from the plastic frame. For example in the case of Weaver hopper cars and due to weight that was added to balance a car, older plastic gives way. I have sometimes gone to the trouble of replacing the entire main beam and bolsters where these plastic components cracked or became brittle.

Consequently, the Hicks car has brass end plates mounted to the oak subfloor and couplers securely mounted with threaded screws so if any kind of service is needed glue will not be required. With the floor and ends roughed out and just like the manufacturer, I started framing the body up and custom cutting the brass stock and soldering it all up. The posted photo of the beginnings of the frame immediately provided the strength I was looking for after pinning for assembly. An added benefit to having a sturdy super structure is the fact that during scratch building a good amount of handling the piece takes place so there is less worry about collapsing or breaking anything delicate. Routine or periodic assembly is required to check dimensions, fit and plain old visual acuity for accuracy. Without any kind of blue print to go by, that is the best one can do except in my case I was also comparing it to other stock cars of that era to see if my own vision made sense.

With a strong body, my long term vision when starting this project was to be able to incorporate detail inside the car. While 6517 does not have watering troughs or a double-deck as near as I can tell, I am pretty sure it had the partition system. Thus in a future post I will write up something on those aspects of the build out when I get to that point. The partition mechanicals are built into the roof. Thus, the framing for the roof also had to be of a certain strength. Once again the roof frame is fabricated from brass.

Image
Image
Image

John-
Wubbel

Posts: 142
Post Re: Old Weedy Buys Stock From Hicks
on: December 23, 2017,
Quote

While model railroad equipment typically can have an abundance of exterior details, less is viewable about the internal features. For example in a 50' CGW box car that was a Hyrdoframe just from outward appearances you would not know what may have been different about this rolling stock. Or what is the difference between a Hydroframe vs. Hydra-Cushion. Very likely it had more to do with the suspension system. Whereas a DF (Damage Free) designation on a car was to indicate that the car had Evans Products Company Damage Free Loaders installed. If the CGW box had a large "C" this was indicating that cars had compartmentizers inside. So depending upon where the cars were assigned and what type of commodity was transported interior features were developed to keep loads stabilized and safe while in transit. Load dividers, flat lift truck pallets (aka platforms or skids) were all considered part of the car on some the CGW equipment.

With the Hick Stock Car, I intend to build in some interior detail by incorporating the stall partitions as detailed in the B. C Hicks Patent. Patent No. 449,740, dated April 7, 1891.

"This invention relates to the means employed for raising and lowering stall-partitions of stock-cars, and is an improvement upon previous constructions of the devices employed for that purpose."

Given the fact that a stock car has some see through between the slats, it is an ideal platform to decorate with detailed interiors. So with some foresight I am keeping the underside of the roof structure open until I can build the partition components. Given that I want to easily disassemble the model once complete, the partition mechanism can neither be solely affixed to the sides of the car and the roof. So this feature will require some further decision making a little later regarding the implementation. Once the partition mechanism has been fabricated, I will finish the roof underside with the appropriate wooden board ceiling panels.

John-
Wubbel

Posts: 142
Post Re: Old Weedy Buys Stock From Hicks
on: December 23, 2017,
Quote

Quote from John Wubbel on December 23, 2017,
While model railroad equipment typically can have an abundance of exterior details, less is viewable about the internal features. For example in a 50' CGW box car that was a Hyrdoframe just from outward appearances you would not know what may have been different about this rolling stock. Or what is the difference between a Hydroframe vs. Hydra-Cushion. Very likely it had more to do with the suspension system. Whereas a DF (Damage Free) designation on a car was to indicate that the car had Evans Products Company Damage Free Loaders installed. If the CGW box had a large "C" this was indicating that cars had compartmentizers inside. So depending upon where the cars were assigned and what type of commodity was transported interior features were developed to keep loads stabilized and safe while in transit. Load dividers, flat lift truck pallets (aka platforms or skids) were all considered part of the car on some the CGW equipment.

With the Hick Stock Car, I intend to build in some interior detail by incorporating the stall partitions as detailed in the B. C Hicks Patent. Patent No. 449,740, dated April 7, 1891.

"This invention relates to the means employed for raising and lowering stall-partitions of stock-cars, and is an improvement upon previous constructions of the devices employed for that purpose."

Given the fact that a stock car has some see through between the slats, it is an ideal platform to decorate with detailed interiors. So with some foresight I am keeping the underside of the roof structure open until I can build the partition components. Given that I want to easily disassemble the model once complete, the partition mechanism can neither be solely affixed to the sides of the car and the roof. So this feature will require some further decision making a little later regarding the implementation. Once the partition mechanism has been fabricated, I will finish the roof underside with the appropriate wooden board ceiling panels.

Image

John-
Wubbel

Posts: 142
Post Re: Old Weedy Buys Stock From Hicks
on: December 28, 2017,
Quote

Thus far I have recently completed the doors. I am now working on the roof topside. The planking is tongue
and groove. While this is probably not anything new to other scratch builders that work on 1900's wood frame
cars, I have referenced the various publications in the car building industry of the times. The Master Car
Builders' Association "Car Builders' Dictionary" 1909 Edition approximately 900 pages of definitions and
illustrations detailing the standards that craftsmen used to construct railway equipment. So even though I do
not have a blue print on the particular stock car I am building, I can pretty well determine to a very
granular level of detail not only dimensionally but all the hardware that was used as well as who the vendors
were that supplied the hardware. The roof boards were typically 7 1/8" by 1 3/4 " tongue and groove. Photos
of the Hicks car are hard to come by. However, a study of the drawings in the Car Builders' Dictionary has
the CGW 6517 Hicks photo but no drawing specifically of the car. The drawing I refer to in the dictionary is the Northern Pacific Stock Car and is like the 6517. I think many of the roads owned or leased the Hicks product. The Illinois Central drawing is of the steel frame construction and it is a good view of builders starting to transition from wood to steel construction. The NP car also had hay racks for feeding the cattle while in transit.

It should be noted that finding the published dictionaries on the web are of various quality. Some scans that
are hosted by google may have come from a library collection and can have missing pages while others such as
a Smithsonian scan is entirely complete and can be sharper quality resolution as well.

Included here is snippet photo of 2 CGW stock cars parked in the Oelwein Yards. I believe these
could be pre-1907 versions of Hicks cars and note that the doors are very narrow in width. The lettering is
also stacked whereas the 1907 CGW 6517 the name was stenciled horizontally across the left top side panel. I have been trying to find a cross reference for dating the stock cars in the yard, the photo which was actually a postcard around 1910. I expect the cars were built long before the postcard photo was published. I believe the postcard copyright is owned by the Railway Museum in Oelwein so maybe they would have accurate information regarding the date of the photo.
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