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Author Topic: Brass Mongering
riogrande4-
91

Posts: 7
Post Re: Brass Mongering
on: February 26, 2018,
Quote

Wow! Wow! Wow!

She's a beauty!

Thanks for letting us see your craftsmanship.

Bob Sobol

John-
Webster

Posts: 21
Post Re: Brass Mongering
on: February 26, 2018,
Quote

Thanks for an education in brass mongering. That's a beautiful result.

Did they move the white flags to the tender end sill when running backwards?

Ed Bommer

Posts: 398
Post Re: Brass Mongering
on: February 27, 2018,
Quote

Yes, if the Forney was running in reverse, the white flags would be in the stanchions on the tender end beam. The model can carry them there as well.

White flags indicate an unscheduled 'extra' run, authorized by written orders from the dispatcher.
They were used to identify trains not in the company schedules, also movement of a locomotive by itself over a mainline between terminals. White (clear) class lights were used at night.

Ed Bommer

John-
Wubbel

Posts: 89
Post Re: Brass Mongering
on: February 27, 2018,
Quote

Perfection! Thanks for sharing your workmanship, much appreciated by another monger here.
John Wubbel

John-
Wubbel

Posts: 89
Post Re: Brass Mongering
on: April 14, 2018,
Quote

I am going to try my luck with an photo file upload. This is a post card for Ed.
Image

Ed Bommer

Posts: 398
Post Re: Brass Mongering
on: April 19, 2018,
Quote

Many thanks to all of you who followed this project.

I will soon begin to work on making some Pullman Palace Plan 70 coaches for this Forney. Plan 70 was a design from 1879 for suburban service coaches and elevated railway cars. With bodies only 8' 9" wide, and 39' 4"long (not counting the end platforms), they seated 48. Thirty six identical windows gave them a 'rolling china cabinet' look of frailty.

But consider such cars never traveled more then 30-MPH between station less than mile apart. Further these cars built for Staten Island use did not carry car heating stoves or end platform steps.

First for a safety, the Gold steam heating system was used. Each car carried four 15" diameter radiator tubes under the length wise seating at the ends of the car. The tubes were filled with salt water, through which steam from the locomotive was piped via a train line. Once heated, the salt water radiator tubes could keep a car warm for up to 6 hours in winter.

No car steps meant that station platforms were all high level. This enabled faster boarding and alighting of passengers - especially for women given their mode of dress back then, traveling to work as typists and telephone switchboard operators as that new technology grew. Further, on Staten Island all stations were fitted with ramps to the platforms instead of steps where possible. Again for efficiency as well
as safety.

Enough of this sales pitch! Here is a drawing for the Pullman Palace Plan 70 coach, as well as prototype photos.

Ever onward,
Ed B
Image
Image
Image

Robert

Posts: 378
Post Re: Brass Mongering
on: April 20, 2018,
Quote

Hi Ed...I'll make a point of following your build. I enjoyed your Forney build so much now I wouldn't miss the train they pulled.

The next issue of OST (May/June) has my article on refurbishing a Pennsy D16sb. I hope you will enjoy that, and please let me know what you think.

Robert

John-
Wubbel

Posts: 89
Post Re: Brass Mongering
on: April 23, 2018,
Quote

Wow, what a huge improvement WRP has done with this web site. Kudos to the Admin & Web Masters. It even works better and is more responsive. Great work guys!

Robert, I look forward to your article on the Pennsy D16. I just subscribed today so I hope not to miss the May/June issue.
John

John-
Wubbel

Posts: 89
Post Re: Brass Mongering
on: May 23, 2018,
Quote

Hi Robert,
I read your article on the Pennsy D16sb in the May/June issue. It was an excellent read and the detailed photos are much appreciated by this Brass Monger for sure. It seems as you know that every project like this involves new problems along the way such that solutions lead to a beautiful end result. Anticipating the problems comes with experience I guess particularly in assembly of all the components. So, my question to you is, photo #61 how many revenue cars is the 1223 pulling? I assume it has met your operational expectations as well. Thanks again for sharing your work.
John

Robert

Posts: 378
Post Re: Brass Mongering
on: May 25, 2018,
Quote

Thank you John. I appreciate your feedback. I can't tell you how many cars were in tow for that picture, but that particular locomotive has exceptional pulling capacity...easily handling my longest trains which are 13/14 cars averaging 16 plus ounces each, and often more. So yes it has met expectations.

Robert

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